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Raise Your Voice!

20 Oct

Raise your voice!

Don´t be played… like someone else´s board game
Don´t be classed out… like some desperate redoubt
Don´t be misled… you´ve got a lot on your head
And nobody´s gonna pay attention when you are dead

So…Raise your voice!

It´s the primary rule
you gotta want to be fooled
It´s our daunted restraint
that keeps us silent in shame
It´s our nature to be
adversarial and free
Our evolution didn´t hinge
on passivity

So… Raise your voice!

Tough Shit Mickey

20 Oct

foxes cower with their clubs, to escape the human race.

Rabbits run for life, deer take cover in the trees

The mother sighs with disbelief, then prepares the meat.


Liberate… Liberate…

Think what you’re doing

Liberate… Liberate…

The system’s set to ruin.

Liberate… Liberate…

Their life is not for profit

Liberate… Liberate…

We’ve got to fucking stop.

 

Because before too long there’ll be nothing left alive

not a creature on the land or sea, a bird In the sky

they’ll be shot, harpooned, eaten or hunted too much

vivisected by the clever men who prove that there’s no such

things as a fair world with live and let live

the Royal family goes hunting, what an example to give!

to the people they lead and they don’t Include me.

I’ve seen enough pain and torture of those who can’t speak

so I’m gonna speak for them In an all out attack

and if someone tries to whip me, then I’ll fucking whip’em back.

Coz I’ve had enough of the madness. In their theatres of hell

enough of them hounding the fox to the kill

or baby seals being clubbed, their mothers cut up.

They satisfy their greed, their wealths built on blood.

Of their slaughterhouse haunting the back of the mind

the gas chamber of farm life, the end of the line.

 

It’s a shame about that mouse

A Thousand Horse but None to Ride!

3 Oct

A Thousand Horse but None to Ride

Painted Heart

A Thousand Horse but None to Ride

With flying tail and flowing mane

Wide nostrils never stretched by pain

Mouths bloodless to the bit or rein

and hooves that iron never shod

and flanks un-scarred by spur or rod

A thousand horse the wild the free

Like waves that flow over the sea

came thickly thundering on


written by: Lord Byron

Is He the One?

24 Aug

Is he the one

Is he the one, that puppy there,
The one that likes to snuggle?
Can I take him with me,
To love and hug and cuddle?

Is he the one, the pup you got?
Boy! he’s growing fast.
Sure that’s what you wanted?
Nah, never gonna last.

Is he the one, just brought in?
They say he is too large.
Put him in the end cage,
Write down what to charge.

Is he the one, the big one there?
Yep he’ll guard our house and home.
Chain him in the back yard,
He’ll be ok alone.

Is he the one the angel asked,
Taking him away.
Never more to be abused,
Or in the snow to lay.

Is he the one the woman asked,
Her dogs all prancing round.
The one with none to wait for,
Well now he has been found.

Yes your the one I know it,
Go find a friend or three.
You will all be mine now,
Come cross the bridge with me

-M. Catlow

The Backyard Dog

24 Aug

The Backyard Dog

You see one in every community, a dog tied day after day to a back porch or fence, lying lonely on a pad of bare, packed dirt. The water bowl, if there is one, is usually empty or just out of reach. Abandoned, but chained up, backyard dogs cannot move to comfort, shelter, or companionship. In winter, they shiver, in summer, they languish . . . year round they suffer.

Of course, dogs can be forced to live outside, alone and away from their human pack, but to force this kind of life on a dog is one of the worst things you can do. Being alone goes against the dog’s most basic instinct. If you doubt this, think of all the whining, barking, clawing dogs you have seen tied alone outside. These dogs are trying desperately to get the attention of their human families.

People who keep their dogs constantly tied outside rationalize it, saying that they do spend time with them. But even the most well-meaning among them do not spend significant time with their animal companions. Under the best of circumstances, the backyard dog gets a bowl of food and water, a quick pat on the head and maybe a few minutes of contact with another living being each day.

Dogs can offer people the gifts of steadfast devotion, abiding love and joyful companionship. Unless people accept these offerings and take the time to return them in kind, it would be best not to get a dog. A sad, lonely, bewildered dog tied out back only suffers, and what sort of person wants to maintain suffering?

– Author Unknown

Canine Bill of Rights

21 Aug

The Canine Bill of Rights

  1. I have the right to a life that is beyond mere survival
  2. I have the right to be trained so I do not become the prisoner of my own misbehavior
  3. I have the right to adequate food and medical care
  4. I have the right to socialize with people and dogs outside of my family
  5. I have the right to have my needs and wants respected
  6. I have the right to special time with my people
  7. I have the right to only be bred responsibly-if not at all
  8. I have the right to some time and space all my own
  9. I have the right to be foolish and silly, and to make my person laugh
  10. I have the right to earn my person’s trust and to be trusted in return
  11. I have the right to be forgiven
  12. I have the right to die with dignity
  13. I have the right to give and receive unconditional love


by: Carolyn Krause

HOW COULD YOU!

18 Aug

A man in Grand Rapids, Michigan incredibly took out a $7000 full page ad in the paper to present the following essay to the people of his community.

HOW COULD YOU?

The Dog that you Dumped at the Shelter

When I was a puppy, I entertained you with my antics and made you laugh. You called me your child, and despite a number of chewed shoes and a couple of murdered throw pillows, I became your best friend. Whenever I was “bad,” you’d shake your finger at me and ask “How could you?” — but then you’d relent and roll me over for a belly rub.

My housebreaking took a little longer than expected, because you were terribly busy, but we worked on that together. I remember those nights of nuzzling you in bed and listening to your confidences and secret dreams, and I believed that life could not be any more perfect. We went for long walks and runs in the park, car rides, stops for ice cream (I only got the cone because “ice cream is bad for dogs” you said), and I took long naps in the sun waiting for you to come home at the end of the day.

Gradually, you began spending more time at work and on your career, and more time searching for a human mate. I waited for you patiently, comforted you through heartbreaks and disappointments, never chided you about bad decisions, and romped with glee at your homecomings, and when you fell in love. She, now your wife, is not a “dog person” – – still I welcomed her into our home, tried to show her affection, and obeyed her. I was happy because you were happy.

Then the human babies came along and I shared your excitement. I was fascinated by their pinkness, how they smelled, and I wanted to mother them, too. Only she and you worried that I might hurt them, and I spent most of my time banished to another room, or to a dog crate. Oh, how I wanted to love them, but I became a “prisoner of love.” As they began to grow, I became their friend. They clung to my fur and pulled themselves up on wobbly legs, poked fingers in my eyes, investigated my ears, and gave me kisses on my nose. I loved everything about them and their touch because your touch was now so infrequent and I would’ve defended them with my life if need be. I would sneak into their beds and listen to their worries and secret dreams, and together we waited for the sound of your car in the driveway.

There had been a time, when others asked you if you had a dog, that you produced a photo of me from your wallet and told them stories about me. These past few years, you just answered “yes” and changed the subject. I had gone from being “your dog” to “just a dog ,” and you resented every expenditure on my behalf.

Now, you have a new career opportunity in another city, and you and they will be moving to an apartment that does not allow pets. You’ve made the right decision for your “family,” but there was a time when I was your only family.

I was excited about the car ride until we arrived at the animal shelter. It smelled of dogs and cats, of fear, of hopelessness. You filled out the paperwork and said “I know you will find a good home for her.” They shrugged and gave you a pained look. They understand the realities facing a middle-aged dog, even one with “papers.” You had to pry your son’s fingers loose from my collar as he screamed “No, Daddy! Please don’t let them take my dog!” And I worried for him, and what lessons you had just taught him about friendship and loyalty, about love and responsibility, and about respect for all life. You gave me a good-bye pat on the head, avoided my eyes, and politely refused to take my collar and leash with you. You had a deadline to meet and now I have one, too. After you left, the two nice ladies said you probably knew about your upcoming move months ago and made no attempt to find me another good home. They shook their heads and asked, “How could you?”

They are as attentive to us here in the shelter as their busy schedules allow. They feed us, of course, but I lost my appetite days ago. At first, whenever anyone passed my pen, I rushed to the front, hoping it was you that you had changed your mind that this was all a bad dream.. or I hoped it would at least be someone who cared, anyone who might save me.

When I realized I could not compete with the frolicking for attention of happy puppies, oblivious to their own fate, I retreated to a far corner and waited. I heard her footsteps as she came for me at the end of the day, and I padded along the aisle after her to a separate room. A blissfully quiet room. She placed me on the table and rubbed my ears, and told me not to worry. My heart pounded in anticipation of what was to come, but there was also a sense of relief. The prisoner of love had run out of days.

As is my nature, I was more concerned about her. The burden which she bears weighs heavily on her, and I know that, the same way I knew your every mood. She gently placed a tourniquet around my foreleg as a tear ran down her cheek. I licked her hand in the same way I used to comfort you so many years ago. She expertly slid the hypodermic needle into my vein. As I felt the sting and the cool liquid coursing through my body, I lay down sleepily, looked into her kind eyes and murmured, “How could you?”

Perhaps because she understood my dog speak, she said, “I’m so sorry.” She hugged me, and hurriedly explained it was her job to make sure I went to a better place, where I wouldn’t be ignored or abused or abandoned, or have to fend for myself — a place of love and light so very different from this earthly place. And with my last bit of energy, I tried to convey to her with a thump of my tail that my “How could you?” was not directed at her. It was directed at you, My Beloved Master, I was thinking of you. I will think of you and wait for you forever. May everyone in your life continue to show you so much loyalty.

A Note from the Author: If “How Could You?” brought tears to your eyes as you read it, as it did to mine as I wrote it, it is because it is the composite story of the millions of formerly “owned” pets who die each year in American & Canadian animal shelters. Please use this to help educate, on your websites, in newsletters, on animal shelter and vet office bulletin boards. Tell the public that the decision to add a pet to the family is an important one for life, that animals deserve our love and sensible care, that finding another appropriate home for your animal is your responsibility and any local humane society or animal welfare league can offer you good advice, and that all life is precious. Please do your part to stop the killing, and encourage all spay & neuter campaigns in order to prevent unwanted animals.

Please pass this on to everyone, not to hurt them or make them sad, but it could save maybe, even one, unwanted pet. Remember…They love UNCONDITIONALLY.

Now that the tears are rolling down your face, pass it on! Send to everyone in your address book and around the world! This IS the reality of dogs given up to shelters!

By Jim Willis, 2001

 

He is your friend, your protector, your dog!

You are his love, his life, his leader.

He will be yours loyal and true to the last beat of his heart!

You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion!